Events

U.S. Customs in New London

October 1, 2015 – May 31, 2016

 

The New London Maritime Society operates the Customs House and is committed to preserving and showcasing the storied history of New London, CT. The U.S. Customs Service played major roles in this history, which were feature prominently in this new exhibit.
Customs was central to New London’s growth as a whaling city in the early and mid-19th century, collecting maritime revenue aboard its swift Revenue Cutters. When the slave ship La Amistad was commandeered in a revolt by its captive Africans, it was intercepted by the Customs vessel the USS Washington and brought to New London.
The exhibit included fascinating information on the Customs Officers who made names for themselves through the civil service and protecting America.
We also featured content on Prohibition Era enforcement in New England, both by boat and over land. And the exhibit will conclude with an exposition on smuggling today, with a focus on illegal drugs and counterfeit goods.
[metaslider id=1387]

Customs and the Golden Gate

San Francisco Maritime Museum

July 30, 2014 – February 15, 2015

 

While we will be disappointed to see the Customs and the Golden Gate exhibit ending on February 15, 2015, the exhibit has proved a great success and has reached thousands of visitors in its 8 month run. The National US Customs Museum Foundation would like to thank all of our generous supporters and the many visitors who enjoyed the exhibit.
Originally planned to celebrate the 225th anniversary of the creation of the U.S. Customs Service on July 30, 2014, the National U.S. Customs Museum Foundation’s first historical exhibit dedicated to Customs’ rich history will close on February 15, 2015.
From collecting tariffs on imported mining equipment during the Gold Rush to battling marine smuggling up and down the California coast, the U.S. Customs Service played critical roles in the history of the San Francisco Bay Area, California, and the nation.
In partnership with the National Park Service, we showcased the connection between Customs and San Francisco in the context of a growing and prosperous nation.
The exhibit delved into the early history of the City by the Bay, touching on the methods and purpose of revenue collection, safeguarding innocent human trafficking victims, protection of US consumers and businesses, and enforcement of anti-smuggling laws — from pirates to drug-runners to endangered species-peddlers.
The exhibit also honored the important roles that Asian-Americans have played at Customs — as Officers, Attorneys, Translators, and much more. Like our nation, Customs’ vibrant and successful history would not be possible without the hard work and dedication of newly-arrived Americans and their children. These pieces will make another appearance at the Maritime Museum in May during the Museum’s celebration of Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month.
[metaslider id=1372]

U.S. Customs in New London

October 1, 2015 – May 31, 2016

 

The New London Maritime Society operates the Customs House and is committed to preserving and showcasing the storied history of New London, CT. The U.S. Customs Service played major roles in this history, which were feature prominently in this new exhibit.
Customs was central to New London’s growth as a whaling city in the early and mid-19th century, collecting maritime revenue aboard its swift Revenue Cutters. When the slave ship La Amistad was commandeered in a revolt by its captive Africans, it was intercepted by the Customs vessel the USS Washington and brought to New London.
The exhibit included fascinating information on the Customs Officers who made names for themselves through the civil service and protecting America.
We also featured content on Prohibition Era enforcement in New England, both by boat and over land. And the exhibit will conclude with an exposition on smuggling today, with a focus on illegal drugs and counterfeit goods.

Customs and the Golden Gate

San Francisco Maritime Museum

July 30, 2014 – February 15, 2015

 

While we will be disappointed to see the Customs and the Golden Gate exhibit ending on February 15, 2015, the exhibit has proved a great success and has reached thousands of visitors in its 8 month run. The National US Customs Museum Foundation would like to thank all of our generous supporters and the many visitors who enjoyed the exhibit.
Originally planned to celebrate the 225th anniversary of the creation of the U.S. Customs Service on July 30, 2014, the National U.S. Customs Museum Foundation’s first historical exhibit dedicated to Customs’ rich history will close on February 15, 2015.
From collecting tariffs on imported mining equipment during the Gold Rush to battling marine smuggling up and down the California coast, the U.S. Customs Service played critical roles in the history of the San Francisco Bay Area, California, and the nation.
In partnership with the National Park Service, we showcased the connection between Customs and San Francisco in the context of a growing and prosperous nation.
The exhibit delved into the early history of the City by the Bay, touching on the methods and purpose of revenue collection, safeguarding innocent human trafficking victims, protection of US consumers and businesses, and enforcement of anti-smuggling laws — from pirates to drug-runners to endangered species-peddlers.
The exhibit also honored the important roles that Asian-Americans have played at Customs — as Officers, Attorneys, Translators, and much more. Like our nation, Customs’ vibrant and successful history would not be possible without the hard work and dedication of newly-arrived Americans and their children. These pieces will make another appearance at the Maritime Museum in May during the Museum’s celebration of Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month.
Scroll to Top